World Refugee Day: a record 100 million forcibly displaced – World


The number of displaced people worldwide has exceeded 100 million for the first time, propelled by the war in Ukraine and other conflicts around the world.

The ongoing war in Ukraine has led to the fastest growing refugee crisis since the end of World War II. More than 14 million people have fled their homes since February 24, with at least 6 million civilians, mostly women and children, seeking refuge in neighboring countries.

In 2021, conflict and violence caused 14.4 million internal displacements, an increase of almost 50% compared to the previous year. Natural disasters such as floods and cyclones resulted in 23.7 million internal displacements, mainly in the Asia-Pacific region.

Overview of global refugee statistics

35 MILLION REFUGEES are children, with over one million children born as refugees

85% OF REFUGEES are hosted in developing countries that are already struggling with high poverty rates.

68% OF REFUGEES come from just five countries: Syria, Venezuela, Afghanistan, South Sudan and Myanmar.

On World Refugee Day (20 June), we recognize the resilience of the millions of displaced people around the world as they strive to rebuild their lives. Thanks to your generous support, we are working with refugees in some of the world’s most vulnerable communities to access clean water, food and education.

Support Rohingya refugees in Cox’s Bazar

The Rohingya people have been subject to systematic persecution in Myanmar for decades. The latest wave of violence in 2017 forced a massive influx of Rohingya refugees from Rakhine State into Bangladesh.

An estimated 745,000 Rohingya, including more than 400,000 children, fled to Cox’s Bazar, the largest refugee camp in the world. They continue to live in very difficult circumstances and are extremely vulnerable to disasters such as monsoons and floods.

Our partner Caritas Bangladesh is working with the CAN DO network to support Rohingya refugees in Cox’s Bazar.

The program supported approximately 70,000 Rohingya refugees through a number of initiatives, including:

Training local volunteers on COVID-19 and hygiene practices

Repair and maintenance of 722 latrines, including the construction of latrines accessible to people with disabilities

Establish and support women producer groups to help women earn income

Organize community awareness sessions on disasters such as early warnings, dry food and water storage, and evacuation plans during cyclones and landslides

Displaced people in Afghanistan face a serious humanitarian crisis

After decades of turmoil and drought, the situation in Afghanistan has become one of the world’s worst humanitarian crises, with economic collapse, long-lasting drought and a brutal winter leaving millions of people in need of emergency humanitarian aid.

Thousands of families, especially women and girls, who face disproportionate risks to their health, safety and well-being, are fleeing their homes. According to the UNHCR, around 3.5 million people are internally displaced.

Unless urgent action is taken, it is estimated that 97% of the Afghan population will be pushed into extreme poverty by the end of June.

After decades of turmoil and drought, the situation in Afghanistan has become one of the world’s worst humanitarian crises, with economic collapse, long-lasting drought and a brutal winter leaving millions of people in need of emergency humanitarian aid.

Thousands of families, especially women and girls, who face disproportionate risks to their health, safety and well-being, are fleeing their homes. According to the UNHCR, around 3.5 million people are internally displaced.

Unless urgent action is taken, it is estimated that 97% of the Afghan population will be pushed into extreme poverty by the end of June.

CRS, our partner in Afghanistan, is currently responding to the crisis by providing:

Emergency financial assistance to more than 8,000 families

Education for 3,791 of the most marginalized girls and boys in rural Afghanistan

Training in livestock management practices to help reduce disease, improve livestock health and increase milk production

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